Trees of the Farm

Ash
Ash
Pear in March
Pear in March
Cedar hedgerow (good for animal shade)
Cedar hedgerow (good for animal shade)
Pine Grove
Pine Grove
At the end of February we celebrated a year living on the new farm in Lebanon. I remember the first impressions of these 6 acres and identifying all the changes I imagined would be necessary. I took down a lot of trees this spring. Most were firs that were packed in close to the house and other buildings. I cannot tell a lie; I even cut down the wild cherry that bloomed brilliantly white with little blossoms for two weeks this spring. After a year with these trees we have a relationship and I sometimes have mixed feelings as we execute our plans. Even under the best intentions, our meddling disrupts the equilibrium. As the old makes way for the new, we will work to establish a new equilibrium that contains even greater diversity and benefits to all life on (and off) the farm.
This big ash sits in the middle of the property and I was sure that it would have to go. But now I really do like it, and the shade it casts over the greenhouse in the summer is limited to the seedlings that don’t want it so hot to begin with.
I am removing the majority of the pine grove, but plan on using as much material as I can for both building projects and chips as a major part of our composting.
We also have a pear tree, a hedgerow of cedars, shagbark hickories, and oaks. All these species are “useful”, from fence posts, to tool handles and firewood. But I hope as we exert our will on these 6 acres, we keep as wide a perspective as possible and don’t stop at a narrow definition of “usefulness”.